From the President
 From the Editors
 AUB News
 Battling Leukemia at AUBMC
 The Master Plan
 The Campaign for Excellence
 Leading the Way
 It’s a Match
  Tarif Khalidi Returns to AUB
 Cames
 Alumni Activities
 Class Notes
 In Memoriam
 Remembering Suliman Olayan


In Memoriam

Ann C. Asper of Roland Park Place, Maryland, died on August 20. The wife of the late Dr. Samuel P. Asper, dean of the Faculty of Medicine, 1973-78, Mrs. Asper is survived by her children Ann, Lucy, and five grandchildren. Dr. and Mrs. Asper were very active with AUB upon their return to the States and had established the Samuel P. and Ann Asper Fund, which supports the exchange of medical faculty between AUB and Johns Hopkins University.
Paige Lea Taylor, 59 (BS ’64) , died in February 2002 in Lafayette, Indiana. The 1964 recipient of AUB’s Penrose Award in agriculture, he went on to earn his MS and PhD in entomology from Purdue University. His career included post-doctoral US Department of Agriculture-funded research at Purdue, eight years with the United Fruit Company in Honduras and Panama as extension nematologist and research director, and US Agency for International Development consultant on banana production to the government of Egypt. He co-authored a number of publications dealing with pest control and crop damage. Survivors include his mother, Pearl, and brother, Craig (BA ”63).
Nasser Golshan (BSEE ’67)
, who made significant contributions to the US satellite and space communications efforts, died in June at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. He earned his MS in EE from the University of Washington and his PhD in EE from the University of Illinois. After 12 years of working on satellite communications in his native Iran, he became an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin in 1986.
, who made significant contributions to the US satellite and space communications efforts, died in June at the UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. He earned his MS in EE from the University of Washington and his PhD in EE from the University of Illinois. After 12 years of working on satellite communications in his native Iran, he became an associate professor at the University of Wisconsin in 1986.
From 1996 to 2001, he was the manager of the JPL propagation group and served as supervisor of the deep space communications systems engineering group for three years, then became a division


representative to the Deep Space Mission Systems Engineering Program Office.
Dr. Golshan also made important contributions in the areas of ground system development and was active in development work for space communication at Ka-band and optical wavelengths as well as NASA’s propagation program.
He is survived by his wife, Dr. Mahtash Esfandiari-Golshan and two sons.


Hala Salaam Maksoud, 59 (BS ’64)
a strong voice for Arab causes, Arab-American dialogue, and Arab women, died in April in Washington, DC in the 1980s, during a highly visible education campaign to focus the US government on Arab suffering, she emerged as the founder and president of the Arab Women’s Council. Her tireless work on behalf of Arab-American, feminist, and progressive causes built her stature as a nationally recognized figure in civil and human rights.
She earned her master’s degree in government and her doctorate in political theory, both from Georgetown University. She taught courses on Arab women’s issues at Georgetown and on international relations at George Mason University.
From 1996 to 2001, Hala served as president of the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, an organization she helped found with Senator James Abourezk. She had a long history of charitable activities, reflected by her establishment of the Hala Salaam Maksoud Foundation for Arab American Leadership in the final months of her life.
In 2001, Georgetown University proposed to establish the Clovis and Hala Salaam Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies. Her husband, Clovis (BA ’48) survives her.